“how do you make a dog stop barking dog collars stop barking”

What you have to do is make it clear that he will not be able to play with you and that you will not acknowledge him until he stops barking. Use a trigger word and establish it. You want to be calm and simply not acknowledge your dog until he stops barking. Then, offer a treat and start playing with him. If he starts barking again and acting hectic, stop playing and repeat the process. Your dog will then figure out that his excessive barking is the problem and the reason why you are not happy to see him.

“It’s an alert. It can be communication that someone’s there. It can be to tell someone not to come closer,” Aga says. “They have play barks, they have attention-seeking barks and they bark out of boredom. There are a lot of reasons, but it’s all instinctual, primal communication.”

Anxiety or Fear: Dogs also bark when they are unsure or scared. They may use barking as they run away the same way a human would scream. They may also use sound as a defense mechanism to keep their attacker at a distance. Dogs learn early that the best defense is often a good offense.

You may also be surprising the dog when you’re in your yard because you don’t go out there often. If the dog is startled by you, you may want to try spending some more time in the yard. That way, nothing will seem out of the ordinary for the dog when you’re there.

Whenever you leave the house, try giving your dog a puzzle toy stuffed with food. Something hollow that can be stuffed with treats, spray cheese, or low-fat peanut butter will keep your dog occupied for at least 20 to 30 minutes, which may be long enough for her to forget that she was afraid of you leaving.[24]

First, get your dog excited by ringing the doorbell, knocking on a wall or whatever you know will start him barking. Say your command word, such as ‘speak’ and pair it with a treat. When your dog is consistently barking when you say ‘speak’, you can then say ‘quiet’ and give a treat. Your dog will have to stop barking to get the treat.

If your dog only barks to let you know he has to go potty, you need to change the behavior. Train him to ring a bell hung on the back door, or install a dog door which allows him to go when he pleases. However you go about it, changing behavior is much tougher than preventing it in the first place. With a puppy, start off on the right foot and don’t encourage or reward barking behaviors.

We have had a behaviourist out to him who surmised that his behaviour was nothing to with cocker rage but more fearful dominance and she provided us with some exercises to do with him that, to be fair worked. However, over the past 3 month as his behaviour continued I started him on Kalm Aid after the advice of my vert. Hunter has also had the plug in diffuser and the collar none of which have helped. Recently I went back to the vet with him as I was at my wits end. There had been a situation where I had fed him in the morning and my son was ironing his work gear and I was stood near him, Hunter began growling and snarling and basically I was scared to move. I advised the vet that we had tried everything and that he is walked during the week 3 times a day for around 50 minutes a time and at weekends about 4 times a day sometimes one if his walks if around 6 miles, so it surely cannot be not enough exercise. The vet prescribed some anti anxiety drugs which seemed to be working however he has been on these for 3 weeks and seems loads better but we have had two episodes of the growling and snarling the most recent last night. He was lay on my knee (not in his normal position) and he started growling, I talked to him softly to reassure him and my lads talked to him, I tried to move him from my knee but he growled and snapped at my hand, although I could feel his teeth on my hand he didn’t mark it. This went on in total for around 10 minutes, he was pushed down but in doing so caught my hand, indented it but he has not left a mark. Whilst all this is going on Hunter is still wagging his tail although his body is stiff! Any ideas what more I can do, he is beautiful mostly well behaved and loveable dog but I actually do not know what else to do. Please help me, any hep/comments/advice would be greatly appreciated.

Work on pre-departure anxiety by exposing your dog to your various departure cues, like putting on a coat or picking up/jingling your keys. Try engaging in these behaviors at various times throughout the day without actually leaving the house.[28]

Identify a place in your home where you’d like your dog to go when people come to the door. If possible, choose a place that’s at least eight feet away from the front door but still within sight. It might be a spot at the top of a set of stairs, inside the doorway of an adjacent room, your dog’s crate, or a rug positioned at the far corner of an entryway or foyer.

Think of your dog as a bubble that could pop. Do you know what makes your dog pop? Most dogs just want to feel safe and need space from things that they don’t understand or scare them. Dog barks at some passing dogs on the street? Then why did you bring your dog over to sniff it’s butt? Stop doing that! Is your dog loose in the house all day getting all worked up barking at windows? Think maybe you should start by not allowing access?

Keep greetings low key. Teach your dog to sit and stay when meeting people at the door so that he has something to do instead of barking. This will reduce his excitement level. First teach him to sit and stay when there aren’t any people at the door so that he knows the behavior well before you ask him to do it with the distraction and excitement of real visitors arriving.

Give her more exercise. Exercise is a great way to curb problem behavior, including excessive barking. Whether your dog is anxious, territorial, or simply bored, getting a good workout will probably help reduce the frequency and intensity of her problem barking.[71]

Don’t muzzle your dog to keep them quiet for long periods of time when they are alone. It can be dangerous to your pet. Your dog regulates his temperature through the mouth by panting and a muzzles prevents your dog from doing this, as well as drinking water and eating.

Remember, animals don’t engage in any behavior unless they get some reward. Believe it or not, they aren’t barking to annoy you. They’re getting a positive stimulus by engaging in the activity. Your job is to identify it, and then give them an even greater reward to be quiet.

No matter why your dog is barking, some general training will help keep his mind occupied and wear him out. A tired dog is a happy dog. Regular walks in the morning can help, even just a 15 minute walk around the block is better than nothing. Two walks a day would be perfect. If you work long hours, consider a dog walker, doggy daycare, a play-date with a friend’s dog or asking a someone to visit in the middle of the day.

Before you call the trainer though, based on the situation you are in, there are some pretty simple things that you can try. The fact that the dog barks too loud or too often may be a sign that he wants you to understand something. It is really important that you do all that you can to identify the cause.

Most the dog bark collars are climate resistant such that it is going to still work even when your dog is out within the rain. To make sure that a pet owner can operate the collar properly, instructional DVDs are often included in the package.The ideal part in using a collar to train a barking dog would be the affordability.

Ultrasonic bark deterrent devices work by emitting an ultrasonic sound that dogs find unpleasant, which startles them out of barking. Reviews of ultrasonic anti-bark devices are mixed; some dogs don’t respond to them, and others are too sensitive for what is essentially a correction. But for some dogs, these are very effective.

Doglover, totally agree with you and do what you have to. Our quality of life has been ruined for 10 years by our dogs barking. We had one dog and he barked incesently whenever I went out so we got him a companion dog, didn’t work, they both bark! The dogs are walked away from home every day and we have 7 acres of land at home they can go on, I only go out for about 4 hours a day (I have a right to a life!) and when we come home, bark bark bark, and when people visit bark bark bark, and when there is anything outside or a noise. Yep, bark bark bark etc etc etc. I’ve tried professional training – not effective if we’re out obviously, ultra sonic collars. Rubbish, spray collars. Ok but only about 50% and not when we come back home, barks right through the citronella spraying! Bark bark bark and very loud! So now, at my wits end, I’ve just ordered 2 static shock collars. We have lived in this stressful situation for too long so as not to put the dogs under stress! But enough is bloody enough now. Lets hope it works. You must do what is right for you and your situation Doglover and accept that there will always be people expressing opinions about everything, both good and bad, but they are not living your life and dealing with the stuff you are. So find what works for you and your dog, don’t make the mistake of discussing it with other people as that just elicits opinions which may not be nice or productive and good luck.

Once you determine the cause of your dog’s excessive barking, you can begin to control the behavior. The best way to prevent barking in the first place is to try and remove any potential sources of the behavior. You also want to be certain not to inadvertently encourage the barking. Finally, give her better things to do besides barking.

I mentioned the importance of your relationship and confidence not only in your own ability to handle situations but also your dog’s confidence in you. This comes through dog exercise, dog training, spending time together, setting limits and boundaries and showing appreciation for behaviors that are pleasing. Controlled walks, games such as retrieving, and learning to be patient by simply sitting or laying down by your side or relaxing in his crate will create a companion that sees no need to bark without a good reason. In this way you build a foundation of trust and confidence that lets your dog know when he can and should bark and also when he can be quiet.

Barking is a normal canine communication, but inappropriate barking – too much or too often – is probably one of the most commonly reported problems owners have with their dogs. It can be annoying and can lead to unhappy situations with neighbours, particularly if your dog barks a lot.

We just adopted a rescue chihuahua two weeks ago, and while I knew the breed was known for barking, I had no idea what I was getting into. We live in a condo building, and ours tends to bark when he hears noises from outside our unit (which I can’t control). I find myself more sensitive to the barking because I know my upstairs neighbors can hear it, and I don’t want to them to make a formal complaint. I’m going to try #1 and #3 and see how it works (he doesn’t seem to enjoy going outside, so I don’t think exercise is the key for this guy). And now I also realize that saying “no” just made him think we were joining him.

If you have a nervous dog, time and patience is key! The overall goal should be to get your dog comfortable around the things that is making him nervous. If you can get a nervous dog to play a game of tug-of-war around things that seem to make them nervous, then you off to a great start! But, most dogs don’t play when they’re nervous, so having high quality rewards nearby can help. This will slowly help your dog associate something great with things that used to make him uncomfortable. Over time, (sometimes a long time,) you should begin seeing improvements.

I live in AA County too and it’s a great law. I have two labs, of course the one I raised since he was 8 weeks old is perfect, rescuing someone else’s mess is another story. The law in AA County is vague for a reason and your situation is exactly why that’s the case. If your dog is randomly barking in the house, they won’t do anything. Leave your dog outside unattended and excessively barks, that’s a huge problem. It’s a great law because if you can’t let your dog in after a few barks or leave him out for long periods of time while he barks, the law needs to get it to stop if you can’t.

Make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Now I should point out that this barking is NOT “naughty behavior” as many people think, nor has it anything to do with boredom which is why using a shock collar to try to stop this behavior is such a cruel idea. Let me explain.

“Often, a dog’s bark means he’s bored or frustrated, and he wants us to fix it,” she says. “In situations where you’re not sure what the cause of the barking is, it’s fair to assume your dog would like to interact with you.”

Think twice before ignoring. Of course another less preferable way is to ignore the barking and wait for it to go away. In a crate or enclosed area this may work (particularly with a puppy who is learning to settle) but if the dog is outside or in a large area then the barking itself can be self-rewarding. In many instances there are multiple stimuli occurring which will encourage the dog barking. In my opinion, dogs should never be left outside unsupervised or unaccompanied. Go out with your dog and do not allow him to run the fence, race down the hedgerow chasing the cars, or barking at the person walking by. Show your control and confidence in handling these situations and be the leader of your pack. Have him on a leash or a long line so that you can reinforce your commands and maintain control without shouting or becoming agitated.

Why am I telling you this? Well, barking has to be the most annoying behaviour problem that is suffered by dog owners and neighbours alike. However, Karina in Copenhagen will be the first to tell you that she is glad that her dogs bark. Of course, it helps that she knows what to do to get them stop barking so they do not become a neighbourhood nuisance. Here’s what she does… Are you ready?

I know first hand the frustration of dealing with a barking dog. Trust me, I have a Chihuahua! While inappropriate barking can make you want to pull your hair out at times, it’s important to remember that it’s a natural behavior for your pup. Barking is the way he communicates and of course he’s going to feel the need to alert you when an intruder is approaching (by “intruder” I really mean a friendly neighbor)!

If you do decide to take this approach, you’ll need to make sure you don’t expose your pet to the ‘real’ sound while you are training them. Pick a time when you aren’t expecting visitors and pop a note on your front door asking visitors not to knock.

It is always better to stop the barking without the bark collar. Find out the reason why the dog barks. Dogs are dogs and dogs will bark. It is very normal. And usually the dog will bark for a reason. When you discover the reason, solve the problem or get rid of it, the dog will stop barking.

Don’t punish your dog if the barking is due to fright or separation anxiety. You may have the opposite effect of increasing his anxiety, and therefore, his barking. A Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist or Veterinary Behaviorist can give you specific directions for correcting this behavior. How to stop a dog from barking

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *