“dog barking at the moon how to get your dog to stop barking at people”

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Let’s look at this from the dog’s point of view. A dog in the home is in its den, and there are often potential threats passing by (anything could be a problem seeing as they are in a world they don’t really understand). Often, dogs will bark at the passing person/dog/bike/car/hot air balloon (this last one comes from personal experience a few years ago in the Netherlands). How many dog owners thanks their dogs for letting them know? What is the usual response to a dog barking? It’s OK, there is no need to tell me; I may not understand Dutch but I can tell if someone is happy or not…

“Often, a dog’s bark means he’s bored or frustrated, and he wants us to fix it,” she says. “In situations where you’re not sure what the cause of the barking is, it’s fair to assume your dog would like to interact with you.”

Before we get into how to eliminate excessive yapping, remember that you don’t want to correct all barking. After all, if someone knocks at your front door when you’re not home, wouldn’t you rather your dog bark to deter a break in?

Repeat this process until your dog learns to associate the word “quiet” with her silence. Once your dog has done this successfully on 10 or more occasions, you can begin giving the quiet command without showing her a treat. If she still complies with your command, then give her a treat. If she does not, you may need to show her the treat for several more training sessions.[51]

Pat Miller, CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA, is Whole Dog Journal’s Training Editor. Miller lives in Hagerstown, Maryland, site of her Peaceable Paws training center. She is also the author of, The Power of Positive Dog Training and Positive Perspectives: Love Your Dog, Train Your Dog.

Fortunately, keeping a dog from barking is not that hard when you know what you need to do. Dog behaviorists and experts have successfully trained numerous chatty Cathies and the method is always the same: find out why is the dog barking in the first place and treat the cause behind the problem. If your dog is barking because their anxious or scared, you won’t approach the issue the same way you would if they were doing it out of boredom.

Consult an expert. There are many different types of dog behavior specialists, each with their own unique qualifications. No matter what kind of expert you choose, you should always check the person’s qualifications and look for recommendations or reviews online. If you can’t find an expert online, ask your vet for recommendations on an expert who can help your dog with her unique needs.[74]

Barking is a completely natural behavior for dogs, but we humans don’t always appreciate it. In your dog’s mind, however, there’s a good reason to bark, so the first thing to do is figure out why she wants to bark in what you consider the most inappropriate times.

Seriously, electric shock collars may not be illegal in the United States yet, but they should be.  Electric shock, especially for a natural function such as barking, is cruel.  I am certain that using this type of device does cause dogs to experience unnecessary and stress.  In fact, people training dogs to be vicious for illegal dog fights also use electric shocks, that should tell you what a terrible idea this is.

It is always better to stop the barking without the bark collar. Find out the reason why the dog barks. Dogs are dogs and dogs will bark. It is very normal. And usually the dog will bark for a reason. When you discover the reason, solve the problem or get rid of it, the dog will stop barking.

If all else fails and your neighbor is making no attempt to curb the barking, it may be time to file a noise complaint. Talk to your other neighbors and see if they are as bothered by the barking as you are. Urge them to file a similar complaint. Look up your local laws, as different areas have different laws that govern dog barking and noise complaints.

In Nature, there are plenty of animals living in groups that have “sentinels” – members of the group looking out for potential danger while the others are at rest or playing etc. If the sentinel sees something that could be a problem, it is raise the alarm. In wild canines, the leaders will check out the problem once alerted and act accordingly. The sentinel is never punished for doing its job, just like how I was never hit by Mum for letting her know when someone was at the door.

Remember, barking is natural! It’s an important means of communication for dogs. But sometimes problems can develop. As the pack leader, it’s your job to step in and control excessive barking. Here are my 5 tips to help you stop nuisance barking for good.

The answer here is obvious, and relatively easy: Bring the dog inside. Many outdoor barkers are perfectly content to lie quietly around the house all day, waiting for you to come home, and sleep peacefully beside your bed at night.

Dogs do more than just bark. They whine, they whimper, they grumble and growl, they scream, they howl…and each communication can contain messages that help you understand your dog. When your dog is communicating out loud, take a moment to figure out what he’s trying to say, and why, and what, if anything, you should do about it.

Try to agree on a concrete solution. Rather than expecting your neighbor to put a stop to all barking, it might be more feasible to agree on a practical solution that works for both of you. Here are a few solutions that might apply; you can adapt them to your situation as necessary:[3]

Toys: Separation barkers benefits from having something to do when you leave the house. A hard rubber toy, that dispenses treats are a great way to keep them happy, and their mouth busy with something other than barking. Just be careful that the toy is big enough not to be a chocking-hazard.

my tip is to keep him on a leash. I have seen a . Why would any little dog need to be off leash in a field is beyond me. Sorry just sayin’ As for having him behave on the lead, I will have to leave that advise to the experts. I just can’t say enough how important it is to keep your dog on a leash. Even a well trained dog can run off if its prey drive kicks in……like seeing a cat, a bird, or another dog to greet (though this one would not be prey drive) But I think that you understand. I learned this lesson the hard way. I thought that my well behaved highly trained dog would always listen to me off leash (I mean really, he ALWAYS did for years) Then, one day, I decided to let him swim in the dammed up part of the river where the water is calm. He wasn’t wearing a leash or a life vest. A duck flew by low and over the river……….then off went Yogi. He is a Labrador Retriever……..he went for the duck and inevitably got caught in the swift current in the middle of the wide river. He didn’t hear me when I called him to come back because of the river’s loud noise and cars driving over the overpass. He couldn’t see my hand signals either because he was out of view due to the concrete walls holding the overpass up. Plus he was chasing the duck. So, I watched on in agony as he struggled to get out of the current. Then, he went under, he came up, he went under…..I was frantically trying to get him to see me down stream because his only chance of getting out was to see my hand signal and come to me with the current while swimming diagonally. He went under again, and then again. When I had successfully maneuvered into his line of sight; he saw me. I waved the signal that I had for him to come to me. He finally started to ride the current toward me and swam diagonal when he got closer WHEW!!!! he made it out. He was exhausted and scared. shaky. I was relieved and wiser. Now, I NEVER leave him off leash unless he is in a dog park with friendly dogs or in an enclosed space or on my friends 500 acre secluded ranch (which has no river) I hope that these 2 examples help people understand that leashes are important. I also hope that you find some help with your dog issues. There are many utube videos of positive solutions. Seek and ye shall find. Happy trails and tails.

Your dog probably has separation anxiety, as you must have noticed by now. When you have time, try training your dog by leaving the house for short periods of time (e.g., 2-4 min) and then gradually increasing the time. Eventually your dog will realize that every time you leave, you will always return.

If you struggle to figure out why your dog is barking and the above advice has not helped, don’t panic. The reasons why dogs bark are not always as straightforward as we would like, and qualified pet behaviourists will be able to help you. Ask your vet or visit the Animal Behaviour and Training Council website to find a qualified local behaviourist who can help you and your pet.

In reference to the leash article above….we react on leash when we see other dogs on our walks. What our 5 y.o BSD male (neutered) does is he turns on me snapping…has bitten me….with a glazed over look in his eyes. We have been dealing with this for a few years and so he wears and accepts a muzzle when we go out…for my safety. He is ok with our 2 y.o. male GSD through lots of careful positive associations in baby steps. However, it breaks my heart to see him so freaked out with strange dogs along our walks. (We walk at odd hours to enjoy our exercise but not have ‘encounters’). Any new suggestions would be appreciated. I had bad luck with 2 separate trainers and refuse to deal with another as the boy suffered for our mistakes. Thank you.

Any pet parent that has had the misfortune of living with a dog that’s especially talkative, knows how irritating barking dogs can be. I mean, if your dog won’t stop barking at night or drives your neighbors insane with incessant woofs and ruffs, it’s time to do something about it.

Once you discover the true reason for the behavior, you can begin to learn how to get a dog to stop barking. The method that you use to stop the behavior will vary depend on the reason why your dog is making the nuisance noise in the first place. Don’t worry, I’ll explain everything you need to know about learning how to get a dog to stop barking in this article.

Relieve the boredom. Many pups bark because they’re lonely or bored. Even if the pup has nothing to bark about, talking to himself may be better than listening to lonely silence. Chew toys that reward the puppy’s attention with tasty treats also fill up the mouth — he can’t bark and chew at the same time. Puzzles toys like the Kong Wobbler can be stuffed with peanut butter, or kibble treats that your pup must manipulate to reach the prize.

Pheromone-based treatment: (helpful for fear barkers and separation distress barkers) plug-in diffusers that mimic the “calming chemicals” given off by female dogs can help to soothe dogs that bark due to stress. While you might not see a dramatic shift in behavior – keep in mind that pheromones are different from prescribed medications – the diffusers are an easy and affordable way to take the edge off a stressful situation.

Excessive barking due to separation anxiety occurs only when a dog’s caretaker is gone or when the dog is left alone. You’ll usually see at least one other separation anxiety symptom as well, like pacing, destruction, elimination, depression or other signs of distress. For more information about this problem, please see our article, Separation Anxiety.

It could be that your dog does a lot of ’alarm barking’, for example when there is someone at the door, or maybe they bark when left on their own. They may bark when other dogs in the neighbourhood start. Or they could be barking at birds or cats in the garden.

work on calming techniques. Do not take her out until she becomes calm. Whenever she is quiet in the presence of the leash give her a treat. at first it will be for any little bit of quiet. then eventually you drag out the length of quiet between treats. It will take some time and consistency. You most likely won’t be walking her right away. She has to learn to be quiet in the presence of the leash, while putting the leash on, and wearing the leash. Good luck!

HI Melissa, I think GSDs take barking to a whole nother level. And they really do need more basic training and more socialization than other dogs. Have you tried cutting visual stimulation in the car? Covered crate? Every seen a Calming cap? Sometime shades like the ones you buy for infants can help to. One thing that worked for my collie was a combo of the game Look at that (you can do a web search) and taking handfuls of kibble and throwing it at the window when he saw a bike or dog coming straight for us. Also having a dog savvy person extra set of hands in the car really helps–so you don’t crash! There is no shame in hiring a great trainer. It sounds like you are on the right path. Best of luck to you both.

did you try putting a leash on him when he refused? carrying him seems pointless to me. also, you could try enticing him with a treat or just get into a routine/bedtime ritual so that he knows a favorite special treat is waiting for him up stairs. He is male, is he neutered? If not it may be time to do that too. His male dominance may be kicking in hormonally and he is challenging you. And yes, we have to be smarter than them, and consistently more alpha (though I hate that term) I mean just be consistent and insistent that it is bed time. The out smarting part comes in with the positive reinforcement ritual at bedtime. Could it be that he needed another visit outside to potty?

If your dog barks at any and every noise and sight regardless of the context, he’s probably alarm barking. Dogs engaged in alarm barking usually have stiffer body language than dogs barking to greet, and they often move or pounce forward an inch or two with each bark. Alarm barking is different than territorial barking in that a dog might alarm bark at sights or sounds in any location at all, not just when he’s defending familiar areas, such as your house, yard or car. How to stop a dog from barking

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